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5 things to do today: Lose yourself in Virtual Yosemite, turn anxiety into art and more

Stuck at home because of Covid-19? The Straits Times recommends fun, uplifting things to do each day

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Clara Lock on 08 Apr 2020

The Straits Times

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1. EXPLORE: GO ON A VIRTUAL HIKE

 

Lose yourself in Virtual Yosemite, an online exploration of the national park in California. You can view more than 200 locations within Yosemite and its surrounding areas via high-resolution, 360-degree interactive panoramas.

 

Zoom in to dizzying views from the tops of Yosemite's famous cliffs and waterfalls or take on challenging hikes and climbs.

 

Scale El Capitan, for instance, known as the tallest granite rock face in the world at over 900m high. It was popularised by the 2017 documentary, The Dawn Wall, which is available on Netflix.

 

Virtual Yosemite even has close-ups of climbers in a hanging bivouac, or tent, suspended along the sheer rock wall.

 

Couch potatoes, however, take note: This does not count as actual exercise.

 

Info: Go to virtualyosemite.org

 

2. LISTEN: TO A SPORTS PODCAST

 

Elite sports around the world may have taken a break, but you can still listen in to podcasts by the experts.

 

Learn how companies and sports leagues make tough financial decisions from Bloomberg's Business of Sports or hear from Singapore's very own Olympic champion Joseph Schooling on The Olympic Channel.

 

ST assistant sports editor Rohit Brijnath (above centre) and sports correspondents Sazali Abdul Aziz (left) and David Lee (right) also weigh in on mixed-martial arts superstar Conor McGregor's return to the octagon after a hiatus in the podcast, Game Of Two Halves.

 

Info: Go to str.sg/JYsW

 

3. DO: TURN ANXIETY INTO ART

 

On this day 16 years ago, then Deputy Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong unveiled the Fabric Of The Nation tapestry at HDB Hub in Toa Payoh. It was made up of 15,000 panels by Singaporeans and foreign well-wishers in the aftermath of the severe acute respiratory syndrome crisis in 2003.

 

As Singapore unites once again in yet another medical crisis, turn anxiety into art with a 28-day #circuitsketchbreak challenge hosted by drawing interest group Urban Sketchers Singapore.

 

The group will offer optional themes every other day and participants are encouraged to share their sketches on social media. Sketches should be done at home.

 

Submit a compilation of all your sketches at the end of the month for a chance to win a $70 voucher from art supplies store Overjoyed.

 

Info: Go to str.sg/JgJ2

 

Those who prefer other mediums, such as sculptures and collages, can upload photos of their artwork to a Facebook event, CCB (Covid-19 Circuit Breaker) Art Exhibition. Visual arts studio Kamal Arts Limited in Geylang Serai will hold an exhibition for the artworks when it is safe to do so.

 

Info: Go to str.sg/JgJL

 

4. EAT: SALTED EGG YOLK CHOCOLATES

 

Countdown to Easter by ordering Speckled!, a salted egg yolk chocolate bon bon made in a collaboration between home-grown snack company The Golden Duck and Malaysia-based chocolate company Benns Ethicoa.

 

The multi-layered bon bons include a 72 per cent dark chocolate shell, salted egg yolk white chocolate ganache and an umami-laden salted egg yolk core. A box of nine costs $22.

 

Info: bennsethicoa.com/products/speckled

 

5. READ: BOOKS FOR SOLITUDE

 

Feeling alone during the circuit breaker? Let books about fictional lives in isolation keep you company.

 

For example, Severance (left above), by Ling Ma, is set in 2011 but bears eerie resemblance to the present.

 

Candace Chen, daughter of Chinese immigrants, works in a publishing firm in New York. When an epidemic called Shen Fever breaks out in China and spreads globally, she volunteers to stay behind to man the Manhattan headquarters for an astronomical payout, eventually setting up home in the deserted office as the city outside disintegrates into apocalypse.

 

Or delve into Everything, Everything (right above) by Nicola Yoon, featuring 18-year-old house-bound protagonist Maddy. Her mother, a doctor who is treating her for severe combined immunodeficiency, says Maddy is practically allergic to everything. Everyone and everything that enters their house has to be sanitised, even the air.

 

Info: Go to str.sg/JGNy

 

Compiled by Clara Lock

 

Source: The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission.

 

 

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